You are here

New Article in Health Policy and Planning: Measuring Family Planning Quality and its link with Contraceptive Use in Public Facilities in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda

July 16, 2018 - A new article published in Health Policy and Planning documents the development of a composite score for family planning service quality based on health facility data and examines the influence of service quality on contraceptive practice based on data from Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda. The article entitled “Measuring family planning quality and its link with contraceptive use in public facilities in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda” was published on July 13, 2018.

Differences in the definitions and measures of family planning service quality have led to differing conclusions regarding the relationship between facility quality and contraceptive use. To address this, Timothee Fruhauf, and collaborating authors Linnea Zimmerman, Simon Kibira, Fredrick Makumbi, Peter Gichangi, Solomon Shiferaw, Assefa Seme, Georges Guiella, and Amy Tsui, developed a composite measure based on evidence on the components of family planning service quality and linked it to individual-level data using PMA2020 service delivery point and female questionnaires. This information was used to examine the impact of service quality on modern contraceptive use.

The researchers found:

+ Before adjusting for distance and facility type, facility quality is positively associated with the use of modern contraceptive methods and short-acting methods in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, and Uganda, but not in Kenya.

+ After adjusting for distance and facility type, quality of family planning services in public facilities is positively associated with use of modern contraceptive methods and short-acting methods in Ethiopia and Uganda, though the association in Uganda is not statistically significant.

+ Quality of family planning services can be an important factor affecting contraceptive use and should be considered when developing strategies to increase or sustain contraceptive use.

PMA2020 uses innovative mobile technology to support low-cost, rapid-turnaround surveys to monitor key family planning and other health indicators on an annual basis. The program is implemented by local universities and research organizations in 11 countries, deploying a cadre of female resident data collectors trained in mobile data collection. Overall direction and support is provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Monday, July 16, 2018